Friday, 11 December 2015

The British Raj Panorama of Collectible Coins

The East India Company, the first British company to start trading in India with the British monarchy's permission between 1600 and 1834 began exchange of money for trading by importing special coins from England; this gradually changed to minting local coinage in India with English inscription on them. These coins were used for trading with companies close by; for the far away ones they got the Mughal emperors to mint coins for them, These coins were Mughal in style with Persian inscription on them & were minted in the Mughal mints. The bullion for these however, was supplied by the East India Company. There was immense similarity between the EIC company coins and those of the Mughals.

In 1835, the great change happened when the British Monarchy took over from the EIC. The trading company was driven out and India came under the rule of the British Monarchy. This change also led to a change in the face of the trading currency of the British.

The year 1835 saw the advent of uniform coinage in the British style with the portrait of the British Monarch replacing the Mughal emperor's name. The period between 1835 and 1947 continued to see the successive monarchs on the face of the trading currency.


Given below are some of the trading coins of British India from 1600 to 1947, which fall into the rare, Collectible Category today

Quen Victoria            Mohur-1841-DL


 Madras-Presidency-Half-Mohur


             


Bengal Presidency Gold Mohur Murshidabad Mint



                                                                 1862-0-3 Dots-Mule         

1939 Rupee (The Most Admired Rupee in British India Coins)



1911 1/2 Rupee (Many Must Have Just Heard About it)

1/2 Anna Pattern 1908 King Edward

      

King William-Two-Mohur



          

 Half-Pagoda-1807 Very Rare




                                            RUPEE 1849 PROOF (EAST INDIA COMPANY)




                                





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